Working Paper 06 General Sir Edmund Allenby’s Joint Operations in Palestine
Publication
Stand Alone Publication / Monograph
LVL 2

Working Paper 06 General Sir Edmund Allenby’s Joint Operations in Palestine, 1917-18, August 2002

British Prime Minister Lloyd George was disappointed over the results of the offensive he had pressed for at Arras in April 1917. He turned his hopes from the Western Front in France to the Middle East. A victory in Southern Palestine leading to the capture of Jerusalem could serve to bolster flagging spirits on the conduct of the war and perhaps lead to the defeat of Turkey. Such an undertaking needed a capable general, one that was experienced and confident, able to inspire a force that had stagnated under the diffident leadership of General Sir Archibald Murray. General Sir Edmund Allenby, having been removed from his command of the 3rd British Army by Haig after Arras, was an ideal candidate.

By
John Mordike
Working Paper 04 The Changing Security Paradigm
Publication
Stand Alone Publication / Monograph
LVL 2-3

Working Paper 04 The Changing Security Paradigm: The Post-Cold War World, Globalisation, Ethno-Nationalism and the Effect on Australia’s Security

This paper analyses how global factors may influence the Australian national security policy and framework. It addresses Australia’s outlook after the end of the Cold War and its initial conceptualisation of the ‘New World Order’. In looking at what happened to the New World Order, it attempts to identify where Australia fits in to the new global security paradigm. The paper goes on to assess the salient issues of the New World Order, such as globalisation and ethno-nationalism, that Australian policymakers need to address in their decision-making in the next decade. In doing so, it identifies the specific characteristics of globalisation and ethno-nationalism that Australian security planners need to comprehend in order to participate effectively in global security dynamics.The exigencies of Australia’s security are also briefly addressed in the context of the changes to the international order this decade. The paper also briefly situates Australia’s position in regard to its critical bilateral alliance with the United States and its relationships in the region.

By
Carl Oatley
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